How many days a week do Indonesian kids go to school?

The school week lasts five or six days, from Monday to Friday or Saturday, around 40 hours per week.

How many school days are in Indonesia?

Indonesian children are in schools for 240 days, Korean 220 days, South African 195–200 days, British 190 days, Singaporean 187 days.

Is Indonesian education good?

According to Unesco, Indonesia’s literacy rate is now high at around 95 percent. Its youth literacy rate is even more impressive at 99.67 percent.

What age do you leave school in Indonesia?

Asia

Age gap Country De jure
School leaving age
-3 Hong Kong 18
-2 Indonesia 15
-1 Iran 16

Is English taught in Indonesia?

Formerly a Dutch colony, Indonesia gained independence in 1945. Afterward, the government replaced a Dutch language study with the English language, establishing it as a compulsory subject, beginning in elementary school. Today, most students study English as their primary second language.

How much are school fees in Indonesia?

Each school in Indonesia charges a different rate, depending on its type, location, and ownership. Generally, primary school fees in Indonesia range from $30 to $40. Junior high school rates range from $60 to $80, while high school rates range from $190 to $400.

Does Indonesia have compulsory education?

Education is compulsory for the first nine years, six years in primary school and three years in junior secondary school. … There is also no path built into Indonesia’s education system to allow students to re-enter and pursue a different course of study.

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What’s wrong with Indonesian education system?

Another problem with education in Indonesia is the poor infrastructure, less developed program, low quality teachers. … One reason is the lack of increased teacher capacity and training that can improve teacher understanding of the teaching and learning process.

Why is Indonesia’s education system bad?

Conventional analyses — particularly those produced by international development organisations such as the World Bank, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and the Asian Development Bank (ADB) — have attributed the poor quality of Indonesia’s education system and its difficulties in …

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