Is Myanmar dangerous for tourists?

In general, most of Myanmar is considered perfectly safe. And while certain parts of the country are still experiencing political turmoil, there have been no reports of tourist-related violence in and around the main attractions (which are a considerable distance away from the regions currently experiencing conflict).

Is it dangerous to go to Myanmar?

Travel to almost all parts of Myanmar is safe. Smartraveller.gov.au advice says visitors to Yangon, Bagan, Mandalay and Inle Lake should use normal safety precautions. Anyone thinking about visiting Rakhine State should reconsider their need for travel. The overall rating for the country is “high degree of caution”.

What should I avoid in Myanmar?

13 Things You Should Never Do in Myanmar, Ever

  • Don’t wear a longyi without underwear underneath. …
  • Don’t walk before looking all ways. …
  • Don’t ride a motorbike in the city center of Yangon. …
  • Don’t sleep without a mosquito net. …
  • Don’t pat someone on the head. …
  • Don’t let your feet do the pointing.

Is Myanmar cheap to travel?

Myanmar has a reputation of being a very expensive travel destination. … But you can just as easily travel through Myanmar on a shoestring as a backpacker. Public transport is cheap, so is food at local restaurants, and simple accommodation won’t cost you an arm or a leg either.

Is Myanmar cheaper than India?

India is 38.3% cheaper than Burma.

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Can you flush toilet paper in Myanmar?

Toilet paper is available at shops all over the country, but not often at toilets. Some places charge a nominal fee to use the toilet. Sit-down toilets are not equipped to flush paper. Usually there’s a small waste basket nearby to deposit used toilet paper.

Are there poisonous snakes in Myanmar?

There are two families of dangerously venomous snakes in Myanmar namely the Elapidae (cobras, kraits and coral snakes) and Viperadae (true vipers, pit vipers, Azemiops). The Government of Myanmar reported 18.3 cases of poisonous snakebites and 1.4 deaths per 100,000 people in 2012, its most recent report.

Ordinary Traveler