Where was the Ho Chi Minh Trail predominantly located?

The Ho Chi Minh Trail was a military supply route running from North Vietnam through Laos and Cambodia to South Vietnam.

Where did the Ho Chi Minh Trail start and end?

Starting south of Hanoi in North Vietnam, the main trail veered southwestward to enter Laos, with periodic side branches or exits running east into South Vietnam. The main trail continued southward into eastern Cambodia and then emptied into South Vietnam at points west of Da Lat.

How much of the Ho Chi Minh Trail was in Laos?

The jumping-off point was Vinh, in southern North Vietnam. Trucks went west to one of three passes—Mu Gia, Ban Karai, or Ban Raving—that cut through the mountains north of the Demilitarized Zone. The trail began on the other side, in Laos. It was 80 miles from the Mu Gia Pass to Tchepone.

Who bombed the Ho Chi Minh Trail?

In 1965, more than 30 U.S. Air Force jets struck targets along the Ho Chi Minh Trail in Laos.

How long would it take to walk the Ho Chi Minh Trail?

It is thought that up to 40,000 people were used to keep the route open. HO CHI MINH HIGHWAY, Vietnam — If relentless American bombing didn’t get him, it would take a North Vietnamese soldier as long as six months to make the grueling trek down the jungled Ho Chi Minh Trail.

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What made fighting in Vietnam so difficult?

Explanation: Firstly most of the war was fought as a guerrilla war. This is a type of war which conventional forces such as the US army in Vietnam, find notoriously difficult to fight. … The Americans, laden down with conventional weapons and uniform were not equipped to fight in the paddy fields and jungles.

What was the most important impact of the Vietnam War?

The most immediate effect of the Vietnam War was the staggering death toll. The war killed an estimated 2 million Vietnamese civilians, 1. 1 million North Vietnamese troops, 200,000 South Vietnamese troops, and 58,000 U.S. troops. Those wounded in combat numbered tens of thousands more.

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