Quick Answer: How did Vietnam resist French imperialism?

It was eventually defeated but several members formed private armies and resistance groups. 4. One of the more successful resistance leaders, Phan Dinh Phung, eluded the French for a decade, using guerrilla warfare underpinned by military organisation and discipline.

Why did the Vietnamese resist against the French?

The Vietnamese rejected French rule for pretty much the same reason that the American colonies rejected British rule. The reason for that is that the Vietnamese wanted to be free and independent just like people from just about every country want to be.

Which groups in Vietnam resisted the French?

The ICP (founded by Ho Chi Minh) had been involved in the uprisings, and soon became the best organized of the clandestine groups opposed to French colonialism.

How were the Vietnamese treated under French imperial rule?

Under the agreement France would recognize the Viet Minh government and give Vietnam the status of a free state within the French Union. French troops were to remain in Vietnam, but they would be withdrawn progressively over five years.

Why did the US get involved in Vietnam?

China had become communist in 1949 and communists were in control of North Vietnam. The USA was afraid that communism would spread to South Vietnam and then the rest of Asia. It decided to send money, supplies and military advisers to help the South Vietnamese Government.

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Is Vietnam still communist?

Government of Vietnam

The Socialist Republic of Vietnam is a one-party state. A new state constitution was approved in April 1992, replacing the 1975 version. The central role of the Communist Party was reasserted in all organs of government, politics and society.

What was one result of French rule in Vietnam?

All leaders were required to renounce their Vietnamese citizenship.

Are there still French plantations in Vietnam?

During the following ‘American War’, many French were still living in South Vietnam, mostly in Saigon and around the towns of Vung Tau, Nha Trang and Da Lat. It is said that at least 17,000 of them were still living in the country as of 1967.

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